Tuesday, May 17, 2022
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How to Help a Stoic Child Open up About Feelings


Eight-year-old Anton was initially reluctant to talk about his feelings. She has had a beautiful but strong personality since the day she was born. When they grow up, they want to live “to the west.” Alex once thought of little Anton, who was sick at home with our caregiver, “cold in the corner with an empty glass of whiskey, chewing on a bullet.”

Anton has been like this all his life. So, when it comes to negotiating ideas, his record has been tightlipped. Whenever he gets angry, he goes to his stormy room, keeping quiet and trying to stop. When I follow him to speak, he is almost physically unable to respond.

Come on! After eight years with this young boy, I decided to work.

A few months ago, Anton became frustrated and went into his room. Instead of going in and sitting next to her, I stayed at the door.

“Anton, dear?”
Only.
“It’s a mother. May I speak with you for a minute? “
Only.
“Well, if it’s all right with you, I’d like to ask you a question, and you can just say yes once and twice no. Would you like to try that? ”
Only… then, knock.
“Are You Disappointed?”
Knocking.
“Are you crazy?”
Knock, knock.
“Are you sorry?”
Knocking.

Through the door, I researched the situation. He knocked or knocked twice, and then, to my surprise, he started to speak. Secure in his room, he was more comfortable sharing his thoughts than we were when we lived next door. He was able to keep his secret and solve a problem.

When he had finished speaking, he asked her to open the door for him to hug her. I was very proud of her for working so hard to open it. And we’ve done it several times since then – they seem to get it easily anytime soon.

“Look! I am a mother! ”

However, I thought I would share with them if the discussion at home could be helpful to anyone. It’s hard to be young, and these kids do a great job growing up every day. Some child-rearing methods that you have recently tried have worked well (or really worked) no work, haha)? It’s always a trial and a mistake! xo

PS A seven-year-old vacationer, with three words that change the way I become a parent.



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